Studio Highlight: Hasna Ceramics


Born in July 1993, Ristina Hasna studied Architecture at University of Indonesia. It was not until the year 2018 where she started to explore the world of pottery. We got a chance to get to know Ristina and her story in how she started Hasna Ceramics in August 2020.


"I got my hands on pottery for the first time during my summer course program at Hanyang University in South Korea in 2014. I was hooked right from the start. “I could do this all day.” That was what came to my mind when I tried pottery for the first time.


In 2018, I took courses and worked as a studio assistant for a local ceramic artist in Jakarta. As I learn more about pottery, I couldn’t help but fall deeper into the process of pottery making. From the experience I got by learning and working with pottery, I learnt that pottery is not only about making things. It is amazing that with pottery we can turn a ball of clay into something that is not only functional but also has aesthetic value in it. However, there are more that we can get from the process and it is the process that draws me in into pottery.


The process of pottery making is humbling. It teaches me how to appreciate the little things, accepting things the way it is and sometimes to let go of things that is not in our control, as there are many factors besides human touch that play important roles in the pottery making process. Throughout the process, you will never know how exactly the pieces will turn out until it is out from the kiln after the last firing stage and that’s the charm.


As I also learnt about design during my study in architecture, I began to wonder how it will be if I start to make my own pottery design especially for tableware. For me personally, it is important to have a job where you can always learn and try new things and push you to grow into a better version of yourself. That was why I decided to open my own pottery studio. By having my own pottery studio, I can have more space and time to explore more about the design I want to make. I can freely explore the shapes, the glazes, the materials and the techniques and also learning about studio management and business at the same time. It will help me to grow not only as an artist but also as a person.


I wanted to be an architect but I also always had a thought of “I’m going to do pottery and have my own pottery studio later, after I ‘retired’ from architecture”. I didn’t know that I would be ‘retired’ from architecture this fast! Hehe.